ABC News Live Prime: Tue, Jun 28, 2022

Bombshell testimony in surprise Jan. 6 hearing; legal limbo after abortion ruling; and one year after the Surfside tragedy, the search for answers and accountability.
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Transcript for ABC News Live Prime: Tue, Jun 28, 2022
- The president said something to the effect of, I'm the effing president. Take me up to the Capitol now. Mr. Engel grabbed his arm, said, sir, you need to take your hand off the steering wheel. We're going back to the West Wing. We're not going to the Capitol. Mr. Trump then used his free hand to lunge towards Bobby Engel. And when Mr. Ornato had recounted this story to me, he had motioned towards his clavicle. LINSEY DAVIS: Testimony under oath by a top White House staffer that President Trump lunged toward the throat of his head of security when his limo would not drive to the Capitol on January 6. Cassidy Hutchinson also testifying former President Trump wanted metal detectors taken away for the January 6 rally and said armed rally goers were not here to hurt me. The team is standing by with more of the extraordinary testimony about President Trump's behavior, including plates thrown into walls, talk of the 25th Amendment being invoked, a new pardon sought. Tonight, the new details about that migrant horror in Texas. At least 50 people dead and a suspected human smuggling operation near San Antonio. A cry for help apparently spurred the gruesome discovery. What we're learning tonight about the suspects in custody. The states facing new legal challenges over trigger laws restricting or banning abortions. Late today, Wisconsin filing suit over a law on the books that predates the Civil War. Clinics where abortions are legal are bracing for a surge of patients crossing state lines. Rachel Scott is traveling to multiple states and reports in tonight. One year after that horrific building collapse in Surfside, the pain still fresh for so many. - I remember hearing people crying for help. And that still bothers me still today. I felt like I left him behind. LINSEY DAVIS: Our in-depth report on trying to turn that pain into purpose and make sure what happened there never happens again. And voters are heading to the polls in eight states tonight, including Illinois. And as Democrats face a wave of retirements, one millennial Republican is trying to take her message all the way to Washington. - Each generation is bringing what we're good at, and what we've learned, and what our life experience has taught us. Then we can create even better policy on the other side of working together. LINSEY DAVIS: Good evening, everyone. I'm Linsey Davis. Thank you so much for streaming with us. We begin tonight, of course, with a rather extraordinary and bombshell testimony coming out of that surprise January 6 hearing today from a former top White House staffer under President Trump. Cassidy Hutchinson sat just feet from the Oval Office. And as we learned today, that also gave her a front seat to history. The former top advisor to Chief of Staff, Mark Meadows, testified today, under oath and calmly, to the American people about what she saw and heard about the former president's behavior surrounding January 6. Hutchinson said that the president knew rally goers near the Ellipse were armed. But he wanted security removed so that more of the crowd could go to the area and march to the Capitol. After the president's speech at the Ellipse, she described a dramatic moment in the presidential limo where she claims Trump lunged at the limo wheel and then toward the throat of his head of security when he would not drive Trump to join the rioters marching to the Capitol. And later that day, she says that she overheard and was told that the president knew the Capitol crowd was chanting, hang Mike Pence. And that at the time, Trump said he deserved it. Hutchinson also testified that Rudy Giuliani and her boss, Mark Meadows, were among the people who asked the president for pardons. And at the end of today's hearing, Liz Cheney raised the prospect of witness tampering, a crime that carries possible hefty prison sentences. Our Chief Washington Correspondent, Jonathan Karl, leads us off with more on the dramatic day on Capitol Hill. JONATHAN KARL (VOICEOVER): Her name is Cassidy Hutchinson. She just turned 26. And today, she told the American people what she witnessed from her vantage point just steps away from the Oval Office as the top aide to Chief of Staff Mark Meadows. She testified that on January 2, as she escorted Rudy Giuliani from a White House meeting, he told her Donald Trump was planning to go to the Capitol himself on January 6. - He looked at me and said something to the effect of, Cass, are you excited for the 6th? It's going to be a great day. I remember looking at him saying, Rudy, could you explain what's happening on the 6th? He had responded something to the effect of, we're going to the Capitol. It's going to be great. The president is going to be there. He's going to look powerful. He's going to be with the members. He's going to be with the senators. Talk to the chief about it. Talk to the chief about it. He knows about it. - And did you go back, then, up to the West Wing and tell Mr. Meadows about your conversation with Mr. Giuliani? - I did. He didn't look up from his phone and said something to the effect of, there's a lot going on, Cass. But I don't know. Things might get real, real bad on January 6. That evening was the first moment that I remember feeling scared. JONATHAN KARL (VOICEOVER): Then, the morning of January 6. Hutchinson testified Meadows was told there were weapons in the crowd. - Where I remember Tony mentioning knives, guns in the form of pistols and rifles, bear spray, body armor, spears, and flagpoles. Spears were one item. Flagpoles were one item. Then, Tony had relayed to me something to the effect of, and these effing people are fastening spears onto the ends of flagpoles. JONATHAN KARL (VOICEOVER): The committee played police radio traffic from that morning backing up the reports of armed protesters. OFFICER (ON POLICE RADIO): I got three men walking down the street in fatigues carrying AR-15. Copy. JONATHAN KARL (VOICEOVER): As Trump got to the Ellipse for his rally outside the White House, he was angry that more of the crowd wasn't allowed inside the secure area around the stage. Some apparently stayed outside the security perimeter because they didn't want to give up their weapons. CASSIDY HUTCHINSON: He wanted it full, and he was angry that we weren't letting people through the mags with weapons. I heard the president say something to the effect of, I don't effing care that they have weapons. They're not here to hurt me. Take the effing mags away. Let my people in. They can march the Capitol from here. Let the people. Take the effing mags away. JONATHAN KARL (VOICEOVER): Hutchinson testified that White House counsel Pat Cipollone was adamant that Trump not go to the Capitol. - Mr. Cipollone said something to the effect of, please make sure we don't go up to the Capitol, Cassidy. Keep in touch with me. We're going to get charged with every crime imaginable if we make that movement happen. - Thank you very much. JONATHAN KARL (VOICEOVER): Hutchinson said Trump was not willing to take no for an answer. And after his speech was over, he ordered the presidential vehicle to take him to Capitol Hill. But lead Secret Service agent, Robert Engel, refused. Hutchinson testified she saw him and Deputy Chief of Staff Tony Ornato just after they returned to the White House with an angry President Trump. - I noticed Bobby Engel, who is the head of Mr. Trump's security detail, sitting in a chair, just looking somewhat discombobulated, and a little lost. JONATHAN KARL (VOICEOVER): Hutchinson said that she was told that when the president got into the car, he believed he was heading to the Capitol. - So once the president had gotten into the vehicle with Bobby, he thought that they were going up to the Capitol. And when Bobby had relayed to him, we're not. We don't have the assets to do it. It's not secure. We're going back to the West Wing. The president had very strong, very angry response to that. Tony described him as being irate. The president said something to the effect of, I'm the effing president. Take me up to the Capitol now. To which Bobby responded, sir, we have to go back to the West Wing. The president reached up towards the front of the vehicle to grab at the steering wheel. Mr. Engel grabbed his arm. Said, sir, you need to take your hand off the steering wheel. We're going back to the West Wing. We're not going to the Capitol. Mr. Trump then used his free hand to lunge towards Bobby Engel. And when Mr. Ornato had recounted this story to me, he had motioned towards his clavicles. JONATHAN KARL (VOICEOVER): It wasn't the first time Trump had exploded in rage. Hutchinson described seeing what happened a month earlier after Attorney General Bill Barr declared that there was no significant fraud in the election. - Ms. Hutchinson, how did the president react to hearing that news? - I first noticed there was ketchup dripping down the wall, and there was a shattered porcelain plate on the floor. The valet had articulated that the president was extremely angry at the Attorney General's AP interview and had thrown his lunch against the wall. - And Ms. Hutchinson, was this the only instance that you are aware of where the president threw dishes? - It's not. There are several times throughout my tenure with the Chief of Staff that I was aware of him either throwing dishes, or flipping the tablecloth to let all the contents of the table go onto the floor, and likely break, or go everywhere. JONATHAN KARL (VOICEOVER): And on January 6, even after he returned to the White House, Trump still wanted to join the March to the Capitol. - He said he wanted to physically walk with the marchers. He wanted to be a part of the march in some fashion. JONATHAN KARL (VOICEOVER): But he did not go. And his supporters soon breached the Capitol building. Hutchinson said Chief of Staff Meadows initially did nothing. - I said, you watching the TV, Chief? He was like, yeah. I said, well, the rioters are getting really close. Have you talked to the president? He said, no, he wants to be alone right now. JONATHAN KARL (VOICEOVER): Then the White House counsel came rushing in. - And I remember Pat saying to him something to the effect of, the rioters had gotten to the Capitol, Mark. We need to go down and see the president now. And Mark looked up at him and said, he doesn't want to do anything, Pat. JONATHAN KARL (VOICEOVER): Trump was even unmoved by his supporters chanting, hang Mike Pence. CROWD: Hang Mike Pence! - I remember saying something to the effect of, Mark, we need to do something more. They're literally calling for the vice president to be effing hung. And Mark had responded something to the effect of, you heard him, Pat. He thinks Mike deserves it. He doesn't think they're doing anything wrong. To which Pat said something, this is effing crazy. JONATHAN KARL (VOICEOVER): The committee pointed out it's almost exactly what Trump told me six weeks after he left the White House. JONATHAN KARL (ON RECORDING): They were saying hang Mike Pence. DONALD TRUMP (ON RECORDING): It's common sense, Jon. It's common sense that you're supposed to protect-- how can you-- if you know a vote is fraudulent, right? How can you pass on a fraudulent vote to Congress? JONATHAN KARL (VOICEOVER): At the end of the hearing today, Cassidy Hutchinson was asked about her own boss Mark Meadows and about Rudy Giuliani, who had told her January 6 would be a great day. She said both wanted presidential pardons. - Ms. Hutchinson, did White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows ever indicate that he was interested in receiving a presidential pardon related to January 6? - Mr. Meadows did seek that pardon. Yes, ma'am. - Really quite revealing testimony there all around. Jonathan Karl joins us now. Jon, President Trump responded to today's bombshell testimony saying that he hardly knows who Cassidy Hutchinson is. But she worked just down the hall from the Oval Office, apparently just a few steps away. - Just right down the hallway, she was there. She was an eyewitness to these events. Of that, there is no question. But Donald Trump was issuing a blizzard of statements while the hearing was still underway. Some of them longer. Some of them a single sentence. Two things were clear as a result of that display of former presidential anger. One, he was watching the hearing. And the second thing is, clearly, the testimony of Cassidy Hutchinson struck a nerve with him. - Appears that she did get under his skin there. And tonight, President Trump's third Chief of Staff, Mick Mulvaney, is responding to what he heard today. What does he have to say? - Well, he said that he knows Cassidy Hutchinson. And he doesn't think that she's lying. He said I believe her. He also said that her testimony was explosive and suggested that others in that West Wing, who are witness to these same events, will, ultimately, have to come and talk to the committee as well. LINSEY DAVIS: All right. Jonathan Karl, our thanks to you as always. - Thank you, Linsey. - ABC'S Chief Justice Correspondent, Pierre Thomas, is here now. And Pierre, that shocking incident in the motorcade after the rally. This is certainly a significant piece of testimony. Cassidy Hutchinson describes the scene with the president in the SUV, though she was not in the car. What are you hearing from your sources? - Linsey, the Secret Service, so far, is not commenting on specifics. But they just informed me that it would like to respond. The Secret Service would like to respond under oath. Two sources familiar with the investigation confirm that President Trump had requested to go to the Capitol on January 6 and that the Secret Service refused due to security concerns. One of those sources telling me that the president did return to the vehicle after his speech on the morning of January 6 and ask Agent Robert Engel if he could go to the Capitol. Engel said something to the effect of that being unwise or dangerous and that the motorcade was going to take the president back to the White House. A source close to the Secret Service just told me to expect that the Secret Service will push back against any allegation of an assault against an agent or President Trump reaching for the steering wheel. Linsey. LINSEY DAVIS: Oh, interesting. OK. Pierre Thomas, our thanks to you. Today's testimony certainly leaves us with so many new details to take in and questions about the impact on the investigation. To help sort through that, Denver Riggleman joins us now. He's a former Republican Congressman who, at one point, also assisted the January 6 committee. Mr. Riggleman, we thank you so much for joining us. So curious right off the top, do you consider this a tipping point? Will it prompt people who have previously plead the fifth to talk? - Well you know, Linsey, when I get up here I actually wanted to-- there was a text that was sent to me that really struck me. Because when I watched the entire hearing, I was part of the data discovery for a lot of this. But we have individuals that are actually sending me text right now. And they have one that's talked about his lifelong Republican father-in-law, who said that he's finally starting to change his mind on January 6. And this individual texted me and said it's the first time I felt hope that maybe facts are breaking through some of these individuals who thought January 6 was just a peaceful protest. And seeing the courage of Cassidy Hutchinson was really something to see. But I was also thinking about the United States Capitol Police today, what they must be thinking. When you hear about individuals in the White House and the Ivory tower, sitting on their couches, or throwing food at the wall while an insurrection or coup-like activities were happening around the Capitol building, it's just a stunning thing to see. But I do believe that Cassie Hutchinson's testimony is a bridge to even more, I would say, massive types of testimony that's going to come out about data and about the operational planning of that day. - And so I am curious that you bring up the point of that text message that you received. Because a lot of conversation has been this hearing, is it just, basically, convincing those who are already convinced? Or do you feel that it is turning some minds around? The text that you mentioned suggests that that might be true. - When I started this, I thought maybe we could-- I know this is a small percentage, Linsey. But what if we could turn the minds, change the minds of 3% to 5% of the voting population for the GOP. That is a massive margin. I think today you saw the beginning that maybe it's more. And I think we need to ask [AUDIO OUT] GOP representative at the state, local, and federal levels. You need to ask them, do you support the former President Donald Trump? And listening to the hearings today, it's going to be very difficult for people to say that with a straight face. However, we do have cult-like activities out there. And individuals really believe that Donald Trump was chosen at this moment for the United States. And I think that's something we're going to have to get our arms around also, the conspiracy theories and fantasies that are driving people to believe some of this. - Former President Trump's Chief of Staff, Mark Meadows, turned over thousands of emails and documents to the committee but then refused to testify claiming executive privilege protected him from having to testify about confidential matters. What is today's detailed and damning testimony from one of his closest aides mean for him? DENVER RIGGLEMAN: I think it's a real challenge for his legal team. And I think it goes to show, I said initially, that Mark Meadows was the MVP for this committee. And then, I've also stated that he's the Rosetta Stone. He's sort of in the center of everything that was happening. So if you think about all the different groups that are involved, you have to think of Mark Meadows had knowledge of most of what was happening. And if he saw things that were untoward, if he saw things that were awful or illegal, or things that were leaning towards domestic terrorism, I find it a real problem, really somebody breaking their oath, being complicit in their silence, that they didn't sort of jump out in front of that and try to stop it. LINSEY DAVIS: Representative Cheney concluded the hearing with quotes from potential witnesses and what she called very serious concerns about efforts to influence their testimony. How serious are those allegations? DENVER RIGGLEMAN: Well, not only those allegations serious, it doesn't surprise me at all right. Both political parties are tribes. And right now, you can talk about extremism on both sides. But right now, the GOP is on a hold-my-beer moment. You have individuals that are very worried about this testimony. So they're promising jobs and promising these individuals that they can stay in the tribe. And there's also that underlying implication of a threat that they will no longer have those jobs if they say the wrong things in testimony to the committee. And that's something in America that we have to push back against very hard. LINSEY DAVIS: We heard today that the former president was aware of the violence taking place at the Capitol and was even warned that the situation was not safe. Yet, he still fought to go to the Capitol. What kind of light does that shed on his state of mind? DENVER RIGGLEMAN: Well, it shows, number one, that he probably liked what was happening. But I want to say this, I don't know what's in the former President Trump's head or heart. And I don't want to. It's just you go with the facts. And the facts state, right now, that, by the way, that means everybody would have to be lying, Linsey, if you didn't believe it at this point. Right? Every single person went in front of the committee. The facts say that the president was aware and, if not overtly, tacitly supporting domestic terrorism. Those who have supported Trump need to answer to the last six hearings, but especially the one today. And they better be prepared because what's coming up, I think, is going to really shock the American people, especially when it comes to the data portion of the hearings. LINSEY DAVIS: Oh, you think that there is still another shoe to drop, if you will? - I think there's multiple shoes to drop. I think when you look at the groups that were mentioned today, you notice, they still haven't really dug deep into the Oath Keepers, or the Proud Boys, other right wing extremist groups, DOJ Charge Defendants, Rally Planners. Yeah, we talked about alternate electors. But there's still more to see there. LINSEY DAVIS: Denver Riggleman, we so appreciate your insight to all of this. Thank you so much for coming on the show. - Thanks, Linsey. - The deadliest human smuggling incident in US history, that is what they are calling the death of at least 50 people who were found inside a trailer in Texas. This is just the latest tragedy to happen in the Lone Star State. Our Matt Gutman is there with this report. MATT GUTMAN (VOICEOVER): Tonight, first responders describing a tractor trailer filled with death. - The floor of the trailer was covered with dead bodies. MATT GUTMAN (VOICEOVER): That tractor trailer carrying migrants abandoned on this rural road in Southwest San Antonio Monday evening. The driver had fled. - It was a horrific scene, something I'll never forget. MATT GUTMAN (VOICEOVER): Some of the victims had made it out of the truck, only to collapse on the road. First responders checking the bodies one by one. - We put a monitor on every single one of those people to make sure that there were no signs of life. - Just to be 100% sure. - Just to be 100% sure. MATT GUTMAN (VOICEOVER): Tonight, there are 13 survivors. MATT GUTMAN: How close to death were these living patients? - Very close. They were extremely critical. MATT GUTMAN (VOICEOVER): Now facing organ failure from severe heatstroke and exhaustion. Temperatures as high as 103 degrees in San Antonio Monday. The city on track to have its warmest June on record. - Those people suffered. The heat was torrential. There was no air in that vehicle. There was no water. The AC was not running. MATT GUTMAN (VOICEOVER): A federal official telling ABC News this is the deadliest case of human smuggling in US history. - Today, we mourn for those 51 immigrants. MATT GUTMAN (VOICEOVER): Tonight, police telling ABC the truck's driver and two others are in custody. Homeland Security now leading the investigation as authorities work to identify the victims. And among the dead, men and women from Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras. - Matt Gutman joins us now. And, Matt, you just spoke with the lead investigator on the case. What did he have to say. - He's increasingly concerned about the fate of migrants across the Southwest border, especially since we're in, Linsey, this unprecedented wave of migration. That means that smugglers are packing more and more people into a finite number of vehicles. More densely packed, worse vehicles, that means that the journey North for many of them is going to be that much more dangerous. Remember, the driver and whoever operated this truck, they're just peons. They're just pawns here. And HSI tells me they're going for the ringleaders, the people who are dispatching this. And they say that these smuggling operations function a lot like narcotics rings. And they hope to get to the very top of it. Linsey. LINSEY DAVIS: And you can see the extent that people are willing to go to in order to try to get into the United States. Matt Gutman, our thanks to you. Joining us now is San Antonio City Councilwoman, Adriana Rocha Garcia. Councilwoman, we thank you so much for joining us. And certainly, I want to extend our condolences as a result of this terrible tragedy that happened in your community. First off, have any possible family members of these victims reached out to your office? - No, not to my office directly. - Could you explain how this truck got through entry points without raising any alarms about the dozens of people that were riding inside? - So that is exactly what I think everybody is wondering. There's a federal investigation that's underway because of that. So yesterday when we got there, obviously, the local authorities had jurisdiction. But after a while, it turned into a federal investigation. And we should be learning some more of the details in the coming days. - In they're reporting, the San Antonio Express-News said, "Human smugglers favor largely unpopulated areas like the section of Quintana Road to drop off immigrants. San Antonio, with Interstate 10 running east to west and Interstate 35 south to north, is a major crossroads for human smuggling." What steps are being taken to catch these smugglers and increase law enforcement presence on the roads? - Sure. And yes, absolutely. So for instance, the area that I represent, District 4, it is the second largest in San Antonio. IH-35 runs right through it from Mexico. And so there's areas that, unfortunately, make it easier for things like this to happen. Right? And so as we go about increasing, we have our folks, our residents, we encourage them to call. The thing is that it's such a rural area that there's only some very industrial things around it. Right? So we have employers that their folks only travel down that road maybe in the morning and maybe in the afternoon. And so, we do patrol-bys. I've actually ridden with a patrol car down the road in the middle of the night looking for things. But again, it can happen within an instant. And we will get some more information, like I said, from federal investigation, and learn just how long that had been there. But had it not been for the person who heard the pleas for, the cries for help, we don't know what would have happened. - The suspects, are they cooperating with law enforcement? - That's also under federal law. So I haven't been given any updates under for that. - Who should people contact if they're concerned that their loved one may have been in this trailer? So the different general-- consul-generals have reached out. I'm in direct contact with, for instance, the hospitals. I have in contact with the Mexican Consul-General. Even the Colombian Consul-General has reached out, the El Salvadoran. There's different ones that think that they may have had folks from their country of origin, and they are, obviously, working very hard. And so I would recommend that they contact their embassies first. LINSEY DAVIS: Councilwoman Adriana Rocha Garcia, we thank you so much for your time. Really appreciate you coming on the show. - Thank you. - Now to the new legal wrangling in the wake of the Supreme Court decision overturning Roe v. Wade, and calls are only growing for President Biden to act to protect abortion rights as patients seeking abortion care in half of the country now scramble to try to get help. ABC's Rachel Scott is at the Planned Parenthood Clinic in Flossmoor, Illinois. RACHEL SCOTT (VOICEOVER): Tonight, facing growing pressure, President Biden's Health Secretary insisted the administration is looking at every option to protect abortion rights. - There is no magic bullet, but if there is something we can do, we will find it, and we will do it. RACHEL SCOTT (VOICEOVER): Secretary Xavier Becerra outlining steps like increasing access to medication abortion, but offering few specifics. Our Mary Bruce pressing for details. - When can we expect more concrete steps to be announced? What's the holdup here? - It was a long decision, and it did upend 50 years of precedent. And so you want to make sure that what you do is within, as I said, the confines of the law. We're not interested in going rogue. RACHEL SCOTT (VOICEOVER): The battle over abortion rights now turns to the states. At least 13 have stopped nearly all abortions, about a dozen others set to take action in the coming weeks and months. CROWD: My body! My choice! RACHEL SCOTT (VOICEOVER): Abortion rights demonstrators marching from Illinois to Iowa. - We have to protect our siblings who can't-- this does affect in other states. RACHEL SCOTT (VOICEOVER): Illinois now a safe haven surrounded by states banning or severely restricting access to abortion, bracing for up to 30,000 more women to travel here over the year. - Patients who are struggling to make ends meet, who are deciding, do I pay my rent or do I feed my kids? And now they have this-- not only added expense and time of needing an abortion, but also the time they have to take off work, and the child care, and the lodging. It's really heartbreaking. - So many describe being in that rock and hard place. Our thanks to Rachel Scott. When we come back, the disturbing video and the demands for justice after a Connecticut man is severely injured while in police custody. We're learning more about that deadly train derailment at a rural crossing in Missouri. But up next, it's been just over a year since this unimaginable scene-- a building collapsing with residents asleep inside. Tonight, what we've learned, and how the victims' relatives have fought to ensure that what happened then does not happen again. [MUSIC PLAYING] It's been one year since the Champlain Tower South collapsed in Surfside, Florida, claiming 98 lives. The shock of those initial days have now transformed into demands for accountability as the relatives of the victims still try to heal. Our Victor Oquendo has an in-depth look at this tragedy one year later. [MUSIC PLAYING] 911 OPERATOR (ON PHONE): Miami-Dade police and fire. Where's your emergency? WOMAN (ON PHONE): I'm in Champlain Tower. Something's going on here! You've got to get us out of here! 911 OPERATOR (ON PHONE): You're in your apartment right now? WOMAN (ON PHONE): Yes, but half the building's gone! VICTOR OQUENDO (VOICEOVER): At 1:22 AM, the 13-story Champlain Tower South apartment building in Surfside, Florida suddenly collapsed as most residents were in their beds sleeping. - I remember hearing a loud explosion, you know, like a bomb going off. - I opened the door to the stairwell. In front of our stairwell, there's a little balcony, and I just looked over. Oh my god, the building's gone! The building's gone! [SCREAMING] - I remember hearing people crying for help, and that bothers me still today. I felt like I left them behind. POLICE OFFICER: Captain, the Champlain Towers, the building, it collapsed. VICTOR OQUENDO (VOICEOVER): Floor after floor after floor, it crumbled in 12 seconds, all captured by a security camera next door. 98 people killed in the collapse, from the elderly to young children, making it the deadliest structural disaster in American history not connected to terrorism. MARTIN LANGESFELD: My mother knew it was the building. She knew something was wrong with my sister. VICTOR OQUENDO (VOICEOVER): Martin Langesfeld's sister Nicole and her husband, Luis Sadovnic, died in the collapse. - My sister's apartment was the last one that got ripped in half. Her kitchen and her living room were still standing. - You could see inside. - You could see inside. - We need to start setting up the staging area. VICTORIA BYRD: And seeing it with my own eyes just left me speechless. VICTOR OQUENDO (VOICEOVER): Miami-Dade Fire Rescue among the first on the unimaginable scene, searching frantically for survivors in the remaining standing structure and the 40-foot pile of rubble. - Everybody in this building. FIRST RESPONDER: Everybody out? All right. KORI JONES: So we just tried to make our way as quickly as possible. And there were large AC units on the roof and other pieces of debris that were falling down. - Keep everybody in front of the fire truck, everybody behind. JENNIFER KERLIN: I kind of had that sinking feeling of-- the sinking feeling of, this is it, but we're gonna go, and we're gonna to do it. VICTOR OQUENDO (VOICEOVER): In the days following the collapse, county officials vowed to make sure all the decades-old high rises along the Florida coast were inspected to see if they were safe. And one year later, at the site of the former building, Miami-Dade County Mayor Daniella Levine Cava says progress has been made. - Miami-Dade County is responsible for the buildings that are outside cities. All the buildings that were in queue for recertification have been checked out by our Department, and I do feel confident that, as for Miami-Dade County buildings, that people are safe. VICTOR OQUENDO (VOICEOVER): But Champlain towers was in the town of Surfside, one of those municipalities not under the jurisdiction of Miami-Dade County. ABC News found only 10 of the 30 older buildings chose to have their inspection done by the town ahead of their recertification timetable, and Surfside has no authority to require an inspection prior to the 40-year recertification. - Raise your right hand. VICTOR OQUENDO (VOICEOVER): Shlomo Danzinger is the newly-elected mayor of Surfside, taking office after the collapse. - As a town, we've tried to evolve and make things go faster. So digitizing the process, bringing more people in-house to review these plans and these inspections. VICTOR OQUENDO (VOICEOVER): Federal investigators say they still have no leading theory about what caused the collapse. - I couldn't believe it, that a building could just collapse without any external force. You know, there wasn't a hurricane. You know, there wasn't a windstorm. There wasn't the damage and the collapse that evening. - Do you remember when the Champlain Towers, both the South and the North Tower, were built? - Oh, sure. Yeah, in fact, we had a lot of controversy. VICTOR OQUENDO (VOICEOVER): Mitchell Kinzer was the mayor of Surfside when the Champlain Towers South was built in 1981. The plans were for a 12-story building. A 13th penthouse level was added after the fact. - I think at the time it was built and the people that were hired were considered reputable people at the time. - I don't think this building was doomed from the start. VICTOR OQUENDO (VOICEOVER): Dawn Lehman, professor of civil and environmental engineering at the University of Washington, was hired by the Miami Herald to help the newspaper investigate the collapse. DAWN LEHMAN: I think it started out too flexible, too weak. And then, every time something happened and somebody tried to patch it, they were not really understanding what the building was trying to tell them. - We started noticing water intrusion. And you could see, like, dry lines on the wall of water running down. VICTOR OQUENDO (VOICEOVER): In 2018, the 40-year inspection report said there were waterproofing issues causing the structural damage in the pool deck area. Experts tell us this area was extra heavy in recent years due to pavers being placed to cover cracks. And in 2020, the firm hired for the inspection was asked for a repair plan. Champlain Towers was in the middle of those repairs, three years after the original report, at a cost of $14 million to fix. David Haber, an attorney specializing in condo law. - Given all your expertise in this field, do you think that this tragedy could have been prevented? - Clearly, a lot of what I would call stop signs were run through. You had a board that was trying to pass a special assessment that could not do so over a two-year period of time, and the price ballooned. You have an engineer who gave a report that was slow played for a couple of years. When you compile this many mistakes on top of one another, that's how tragedies occur. VICTOR OQUENDO (VOICEOVER): In May, Governor DeSantis signing a law with stricter building codes, which will require coastal high-rises to undergo structural recertification at 25 years. - This is the first time since October that I've been here. [SOBBING] My brain cannot wrap around just an empty hole. VICTOR OQUENDO (VOICEOVER): Last September, Miami-Dade County Judge Michael Hanzman approved the $120 million sale of the land where Champlain Towers once stood. - These were my closest friends, Richard Augustine and Elaine Howard Sabino. - Last week, we received a call saying they found human remains of my sister. - Almost a year later. - They found human remains in a pile that I had to do a press conference for pushing them not to throw away. VICTOR OQUENDO (VOICEOVER): And in May, in a swift move with complicated class action lawsuits, the judge approved record settlements of $96 million for owners who lost 136 units and another $1 billion for families of the victims. - You can personally offer my family $100 billion, and we would give everything back to hug my sister just one time. This investigation cannot be stopped, and people can't look the other way just because $1 billion came. [MUSIC PLAYING] - Our thanks to Victor for that. Still ahead here on Prime, British heiress Ghislaine Maxwell learns just how long she'll spend behind bars, and how climate change is dramatically reducing your access to July 4th food favorites, by the numbers. But first, our tweet of the day from one of former President Trump's Chief of Staffs vouching for the character of today's blockbuster January 6 hearing witness. [MUSIC PLAYING] Welcome back, everyone. By now, all good chiliheads have surely stocked up on all things Sriracha. But climate-related disasters and extreme weather are certainly taking their toll on much more than just hot sauce. We have a grocery list with just a few of the goods that are facing rising prices and shortages by the numbers. Need some hot dog buns? Drought caused an 8% drop in US winter wheat production according to the USDA. And in India, 120-degree temperatures damaged this season's wheat crop, all adding to the worldwide wheat shortage. Mustard for those 4th of July hot dogs? Mustard seed production was down 50% last year, leading to shortages this year. Producers in France and Canada say extreme weather is to blame. Corn, NASA forecasts corn crops will drop 24% by 2030 due to climate change, a blow to summer cookouts as well as a staple grain and farm animal feed around the world. Apples, Michigan grew 17% fewer apples last year. Crops were also down in Wisconsin after a heavy frost in the last spring damaged blooms across the region. Coffee, 70%-- that's how much the price went up from 2020 to 2021 after droughts and frost destroyed crops in Brazil. Experts warn as temperatures rise, there's little room for the high-altitude crops to move. And wine-- French makers reported $2 billion in losses after the worst season since 1957 due to high temperatures and heavy rains. Experts say without significant action, this list will only continue to grow. They warn continued food price increases and shortages will be felt hardest by low-income Americans as everything from school lunches and food aid programs are impacted. And we still have lots to get to here on Prime tonight. As Democrats face a wave of retirements ahead of this year's midterms, we talked to one Illinois Republican who's trying to bring the voice of a younger generation to Washington. And how effective the next generation of COVID vaccines may be when it comes to protection. First, look at our top trending stories on abcnews.com. [MUSIC PLAYING] REPORTER: New bombshell testimony alleging that on the day of the January 6 insurrection, Former President Donald Trump said he didn't care that his supporters had weapons. Cassidy Hutchinson, a top aide to Trump's Chief of Staff Mark Meadows, told the House Select Committee investigating the deadly Capitol riot that Trump was furious his rally on the Ellipse didn't appear to be at maximum capacity. Hutchinson testifying under oath that the president was angry security magnetometers were being used on his supporters and that the Secret Service was turning away anyone with weapons. - I was in the vicinity of a conversation where I overheard the president say something to the effect of, you know, I don't effing care that they have weapons. They're not here to hurt me. Take the effing mags away. REPORTER: Hutchinson also recalling a physical altercation with a Secret Service agent on January 6 after Trump insisted on driving to the Capitol. REPORTER: The family of a Connecticut man seriously injured in police custody is calling for justice. 36-year-old Richard Randy Cox was arrested on June 19 for unlawfully possessing a firearm and placed in a police van that didn't have seatbelts. Disturbing video shows Cox sliding over and appearing to hit his head on the wall when the van stops abruptly. Police eventually stop to check on Cox as he calls for help and says he can't move, them calling for an ambulance to meet them at the police station. When the van arrives, officers are seen dragging Cox out of the van and transporting him to a cell as he says he can't move. At a press conference, Cox's family and attorney Ben Crump said he is paralyzed. - This young man who had his whole life ahead of him deserves full justice. - Knowing that he would never walk again, possibly, it's disheartening. [WHOOSH] REPORTER: A judge in New York sentenced Ghislaine Maxwell to 20 years in prison for her conviction on five counts, including sex trafficking. REPORTER: Maxwell and Jeffrey Epstein were, federal prosecutors said, partners in crime who sexually exploited young girls together. The victims were plied with gifts, flattery, and promises of career help and what prosecutors described as Maxwell's pattern of grooming and abuse. The defense said Epstein was always the central figure and the principal abuser. [WHOOSH] REPORTER: Indictments won't stand against former Michigan Governor Rick Snyder, his Health Director and seven others over the Flint Water Crisis, the Michigan Supreme Court ruling a lower court judge had no authority to issue the indictments in the first place. The decision is a blow to Attorney General Dana Nessel who took office in 2019, dismissed a special prosecutor, and put together a new team to investigate whether crimes were committed when lead contaminated Flint's water system dating back to 2014. Snyder was charged with misdemeanors, while others were charged with involuntary manslaughter for the deaths that were tied to the scandal. [WHOOSH] REPORTER: COVID vaccines will be getting a new look this fall, FDA advisors voting in favor of updating shots to include the current strain of the Omicron variant, as well as the original COVID-19 strain. This after representatives from Pfizer and Moderna presented studies indicating that their next-generation shots would be more effective than boosters currently available. Experts saying they're worried about a potential surge of COVID cases this fall and winter as vaccine efficacy continues to wane. The new shots should be ready to go by October. [WHOOSH] - Next tonight, to the new developments after that deadly collision between a train and a dump truck in rural Missouri. ABC's transportation correspondent Gio Benitez reports from near the scene. GIO BENITEZ (VOICEOVER): Tonight, the death toll rising to 4 as federal investigators search for answers as to what caused this derailment in Central Missouri. After the LA to Chicago-bound Amtrak train hit a dump truck stuck on the tracks, 16 members of a Wisconsin-based Boy Scout troop sprang into action. - I'm proud of them. One Scout wrapped his hand and-- took his shirt off, wrapped his hand, and had to break some windows to get people out. Another Scout went and comforted the driver of the truck that was hit and tried to stabilize him. That Scout is pretty shook up. GIO BENITEZ (VOICEOVER): That driver did not survive. The crossing where this happened, like many in rural areas, did not have any lights or control devices. Local Farmer Mike Spencer posting this video just two weeks ago showing the steep crossing, saying he has been warning about it for years. - It's really hard to see the trains until you get right up almost on the tracks. It was pretty predictable. - Our thanks to Gio for that. Turning now to the midterm elections. As Democrats try to hold on to the House this November, they're facing a wave of retirements in Congress that will make that job a lot more challenging. And as we found in one Illinois House race, Republicans are hoping to take advantage of some open seats to bring new voices to Congress as they look to take back control of the House. Here's ABC's Averi Harper. - We can fire Nancy Pelosi. [CHEERS, APPLAUSE] AVERI HARPER (VOICEOVER): This is Esther Joy King, a Republican who narrowly lost her 2020 congressional bid to Illinois Congresswoman Cheri Bustos. But the five-term incumbent Bustos is now one of 32 Democrats not running for reelection in the House. - Retirements are a part of the natural cycle. AVERI HARPER (VOICEOVER): So with momentum behind the Republican Party heading into November, King is back at it with her eyes set on victory. - Because we came so close last time, we knew we were gonna have a great shot at winning in the 2022 election. AVERI HARPER (VOICEOVER): The 35-year-old is a part of a wave of millennial Congressional candidates vying for a chance to bring their ideas to Washington, where elder statesmen dominate on Capitol Hill. - As a young person, what I believe I bring to the table, I believe I bring energy, and motivation, and passion, and creative ideas. But how do I bring those elements to the table and partner with the wisdom, and experience, and know-how of generations that are older than me, and really build better outcomes? Each generation is bringing what we're good at, and what we've learned, and what our life experience has taught us. Then, we can create even better policy on the other side of working together. AVERI HARPER (VOICEOVER): King is an attorney who grew up on the Mexican side of the Southern border in Ciudad Juarez where her parents were missionaries and raised her with her siblings. AVERI HARPER: You talk about a pathway to citizenship for those who were brought here at a young age. You talk about compassion. You talk about the fact that the US is a nation of immigrants. Did that experience in Mexico as a child shape the way that you feel about that? - Yeah, certainly. It certainly does shape who I am. The American communities are overburdened by just the influx and the number of people that are coming across our border. But more so, growing up on the border gave me a perspective, also, for the people themselves, the people that are coming across. They do have an American dream, and they come here to make their lives better, but right now, they're being human trafficked, and our Southern border is being controlled by drug cartels. AVERI HARPER (VOICEOVER): King is also an army reservist and spent time working in Kabul, Afghanistan. In the aftermath of the US troop withdrawal last August, King says she helped evacuate dozens of Afghans, including young women and girls. - I was impassioned and had fire in my belly before, but going through that experience and helping save lives because of the mistakes of our administration, I went from being on fire to being supercharged. I'm fighting for our country. I'm fighting for bringing accountability to Washington, DC. And it truly matters. AVERI HARPER (VOICEOVER): In order to get to Washington, she'll first have to defeat a single GOP opponent in the primary, but she's the overwhelming favorite in the race. Then she would face the winner of the Democratic primary, where the field is crowded. Former local meteorologist Eric Sorensen is one of the Democratic candidates considered a front-runner. - After a 22-year career as a weatherman, some things stay with you. AVERI HARPER (VOICEOVER): After delivering weather reports on-air for years, the 46-year-old says he wants to deliver change for this area's voters. Climate change and how it's impacted this rural part of Illinois is the central focus of his campaign. AVERI HARPER: When folks are looking at the rising costs of things like housing, of gas, of food, that climate change might not fall at the top of the list of their priorities, what do you say to that voter? - Well, we've learned here that climate change is a top issue for the people in the district. And it's the tornadoes that are happening in January and November. It's the fact that seven of our top 10 floods on the Mississippi River here have happened since the Great Flood of 1993. And they know about this because they've had someone on television that has talked with them about it, and that's been me. - Hi, everybody. Jonathan Logemann here. My wife Sarah and I are about to head out for another school day as teachers. AVERI HARPER (VOICEOVER): The other candidate considered a front-runner is Jonathan Logemann, a veteran, local lawmaker, and teacher from Rockford, Illinois. He's also a 35-year-old millennial parent with young children. - All right, girls, say, "have a good day." - [BLOWS RASPBERRY] - Oh, my gosh! - We have too few parents of little children here in Washington and that perspective of balancing everything, right? Generational diversity is imperative in bringing different voices and, you know, seeing, like, the issues that the American people face. I'm a teacher. My wife is a teacher. We face these issues too. And I think bringing that perspective to Washington is something that is very much needed. AVERI HARPER (VOICEOVER): While the district was once a Democratic stronghold, it's shifted red in recent years, many of the counties within the district going for Trump in 2016 and 2020. And with the incumbent Bustos retiring, experts say this race will be a toss-up in November. It's a turning tide that King is hoping to take advantage of. - It's an area that probably voted Democrat 20 years ago because their grandparents voted Democrat, their parents voted Democrat, their union bosses tell them to vote Democrat. But when they realize that, wait a second, these values don't align with what we believe. And when you get to know them, we go to church, we love hunting and sportsmanship, and we support the Second Amendment here in Western Illinois. Those voters have started voting Republican, and it truly is an honor to be part of it. OK. Hi! - Our thanks to Averi. And before we go tonight, the image of the day, the remarkable scene inside the US Capitol. The 26-year-old former top aide to Trump White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows breaking from her former bosses in front of the bipartisan committee. If you missed any of her explosive testimony, we'll have a full re-airing of today's hearing at 11:00 Eastern 8:00 Pacific right here on ABC News Live. And that's our show for this hour. be sure to stay tuned to ABC News Live for more context and analysis of the day's top stories. Thanks so much for streaming with us. [MUSIC PLAYING] And coming up in the next hour, polls are closing in several states. It's another election night in America. We're tracking the results. And more on that stunning January 6 hearing and what we learned about the former president's shocking actions that day. Hi there, I'm Linsey Davis. Thanks so much for streaming with us. We're monitoring several developments here at ABC News at this hour. Maternal mortality rates in the US have climbed 33% since the start of the pandemic, with Black and Hispanic women dying at higher rates than white women. Access to care, medical mistrust, and systemic discrimination are just a few of the inequities that contribute to more COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations, and deaths among racial and ethnic minorities, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The first case of chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE, in a soccer player has been diagnosed by researchers. The Boston University CTE Center said former MLS defender Scott Vermillion, who died of an accidental drug overdose in December of 2020 at the age of 44, suffered from the degenerative brain disease. CTE has been found in more than 100 former NFL players, as well as semi-pro and high school soccer players. Vermillion is the first from MLS. Airbnb is making its ban on parties permanent at homes listed on the site for short-term rentals. Airbnb began to crack down on parties in 2019 after a fatal shooting at a party in a house in California. At that time, the company prohibited advertising parties at Airbnb locations on social media. The number of parties at Airbnb locations increased during the pandemic, Airbnb said, as people moved gatherings from bars and clubs to rented homes. That led to a temporary ban in 2020. Extraordinary and bombshell testimony today in that surprise January 6 hearing from a former top White House staffer under President Trump. Cassidy Hutchinson sat just feet away from the Oval Office, and as we learned today, that also gave her a front seat to history. The former top advisor to Chief of Staff Mark Meadows testifying today under oath and calmly to the American people about what she said she saw and heard about the former president's behavior surrounding January 6. Our Chief Washington Correspondent Jonathan Karl has more on the dramatic day on Capitol Hill. JONATHAN KARL (VOICEOVER): Her name is Cassidy Hutchinson, she just turned 26, and today, she told the American people what she witnessed from her vantage point just steps away from the Oval Office as the top aide to Chief of Staff Mark Meadows. She testified that on January 2, as she escorted Rudy Giuliani from a White House meeting, he told her Donald Trump was planning to go to the Capitol himself on January 6. - He looked at me and said something to the effect of, Cass, are you excited for the 6th? It's going to be a great day. I remember looking at him saying, Rudy, could you explain what's happening on the 6th? And he had responded something to the effect of, we're going to the Capitol. It's going to be great. The president's going to be there. He's going to look powerful. He's going to be with the members. He's going to be with the senators. Talk to the chief about it. Talk to the chief about it. He knows about it. - And did you go back, then, up to the West Wing and tell Mr. Meadows about your conversation with Mr. Giuliani? - I did. He didn't look up from his phone and said something to the effect of, there's a lot going on, Cass, but I don't know. Things might get real, real bad on January 6. That evening was the first moment that I remember feeling scared. JONATHAN KARL (VOICEOVER): Then the morning of January 6, Hutchinson testified Meadows was told there were weapons in the crowd. - Where I remember Tony mentioning knives, guns in the form of pistols and rifles, bear spray, body armor, spears, and flagpoles. Spears were one item, flagpoles were one item. Then, Tony had relayed to me something to the effect of, and these effing people are fastening spears onto the ends of flagpoles. JONATHAN KARL (VOICEOVER): The committee played police radio traffic from that morning backing up the reports of armed protesters. OFFICER (ON POLICE RADIO): I got three men walking down the street in fatigues with carrying AR-15s, copy. JONATHAN KARL (VOICEOVER): As Trump got to the Ellipse for his rally outside the White House, he was angry that more of the crowd wasn't allowed inside the secure area around the stage. Some apparently stayed outside the security perimeter because they didn't want to give up their weapons. - He wanted it full, and he was angry that we weren't letting people through the mags with weapons. I overheard the president say something to the effect of, you know, I don't effing care that they have weapons. They're not here to hurt me. Take the effing mags away. Let my people in. They can march to the Capitol from here. Let the people in, and take the effing mags away. JONATHAN KARL (VOICEOVER): Hutchinson testified that White House Counsel Pat Cipollone was adamant that Trump not go to the Capitol. - Mr. Cipollone said something to the effect of, please make sure we don't go up to the Capitol, Cassidy. Keep in touch with me. We're going to get charged with every crime imaginable if we make that movement happen. - Incredible. Thank you very much. JONATHAN KARL (VOICEOVER): Hutchinson said Trump was not willing to take no for an answer, and after his speech was over, he ordered the presidential vehicle to take him to Capitol Hill. But Lead Secret Service agent Robert Engel refused. Hutchinson testified she saw him and Deputy Chief of Staff Tony Ornato just after they returned to the White House with an angry President Trump. - I noticed Bobby Engel, who is the head of Mr. Trump's security detail, sitting in a chair looking somewhat discombobulated and a little lost. JONATHAN KARL (VOICEOVER): Hutchinson said that she was told that when the president got into the car, he believed he was heading to the Capitol. - So once the president had gotten into the vehicle with Bobby, he thought that they were going up to the Capitol. And when Bobby had relayed to him, we're not, we don't have the assets to do it, it's not secure, we're going back to The West Wing, the president had a very strong, a very angry response to that. Tony described him as being irate. The president said something to the effect of, I'm the effing president. Take me up to the Capitol now! To which Bobby responded, sir, we have to go back to the West Wing. The president reached up towards the front of the vehicle to grab at the steering wheel. Mr. Engel grabbed his arm and said, sir, you need to take your hand off the steering wheel. We're going back to the West Wing. We're not going to the Capitol. Mr. Trump then used his free hand to lunge towards Bobby Engel. And when Mr. Ornato had recounted this story to me, he had motioned towards his clavicles. JONATHAN KARL (VOICEOVER): It wasn't the first time Trump had exploded in rage. Hutchinson described seeing what happened a month earlier after Attorney General Bill Barr declared that there was no significant fraud in the election. - Ms. Hutchinson, how did the president react to hearing that news? - I first noticed there was ketchup dripping down the wall, and there was a shattered porcelain plate on the floor. The valet had articulated that the president was extremely angry at the Attorney General's AP interview and had thrown his lunch against the wall. - And Ms. Hutchinson, was this the only instance that you are aware of where the president threw dishes? - It's not. There were several times throughout my tenure with the chief of staff that I was aware of him either throwing dishes or flipping the tablecloth to let all the contents of the table go onto the floor and likely break, or go everywhere. JONATHAN KARL (VOICEOVER): And on January 6, even after he returned to the White House, Trump still wanted to join the march to the Capitol. - He said he wanted to physically walk with the marchers. He wanted to be a part of the march in some fashion. JONATHAN KARL (VOICEOVER): But he did not go, and his supporters soon breached the Capitol building. [SCREAMING] Hutchinson said Chief of Staff Meadows initially did nothing. - He was sitting watching the TV, Chief? And he was like, yeah. I said, well, the rioters are getting really close. Have you talked to the president? He said, no, he wants to be alone right now. JONATHAN KARL (VOICEOVER): Then the White House Counsel came rushing in. - And I remember Pat saying to him something to the effect of, the rioters had gotten to the Capitol, Mark. We need to go down and see the president now. And Mark looked up at him and said, he doesn't want to do anything, Pat. JONATHAN KARL (VOICEOVER): Trump was even unmoved by his supporters chanting, hang Mike Pence. - I remember Pat saying something to the effect of, Mark, we need to do something more. They're literally calling for the vice president to be effing hung. And Mark had responded something to the effect of, you heard him, Pat. He thinks Mike deserves it. He doesn't think they're doing anything wrong. To which Pat said something, this is effing crazy. JONATHAN KARL (VOICEOVER): The committee pointed out, it's almost exactly what Trump told me six weeks after he left the White House. JONATHAN KARL (ON RECORDING): Saying, hang Mike Pence? DONALD TRUMP (ON RECORDING): Because it's common sense, John. It's common sense that you're supposed to protect. How can you, if you know a vote is fraudulent, right, how can you pass on a fraudulent vote to Congress? JONATHAN KARL (VOICEOVER): At the end of the hearing today, Cassidy Hutchinson was asked about her own boss, Mark Meadows, and about Rudy Giuliani, who had told her January 6 would be a great day. She said both wanted presidential pardons. - Ms. Hutchinson did White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows ever indicate that he was interested in receiving a presidential pardon related to January 6? - Mr. Meadows did seek that pardon. Yes, ma'am. LINSEY DAVIS: Our thanks to Jonathan Karl. Today's testimony certainly leaves us with so many new details to take in and questions about the impact on the investigation. To help sort through that, Denver Riggleman joins us now. He's a former Republican congressman who at one point also assisted the January 6 Committee. Mr. Riggleman, we thank you so much for joining us. So curious, right off the top, do you consider this a tipping point? Will it prompt people who have previously pled the Fifth to talk? - Well, you know, Linsey, you know, when I get up here, I actually wanted to-- there was a text that was sent to me that really struck me, because when I saw the-- you know, I watched the entire hearing. I was part of the data discovery for a lot of this. But we have individuals that are actually sending me texts right now. And they have one that's talked about his lifelong Republican father-in-law, who said that he's finally starting to change his mind on January 6. When his individual texted me, he said, it's the first time I felt hope that maybe facts are breaking through to some of these individuals who thought January 6 was just a peaceful protest. And seeing the courage of Cassidy Hutchinson was really something to see. But I was also thinking about the United States Capitol Police today, what they must be thinking. When you hear about individuals in the White House, in the Ivory Tower, sitting on their couches or throwing food at the wall while, you know, an insurrection or coup-like activities were happening around the Capitol building, it's just a stunning thing to see. But I do believe that Cassidy Hutchinson's testimony is a bridge to even more, I would say, massive types of testimony that's going to come out about data and about the operational planning of that day. - And so I am curious that you bring up the point of that text message that you received. Because you know, a lot of conversation has been, this hearing, is it just, basically, convincing those who are already convinced? Or do you feel that it is turning some minds around? The text that you mentioned suggests that that might be true. - You know, when I started this, I thought maybe we could-- I know this is a small percentage, Linsey, but what if we could turn the minds, you know, change the minds of 3% to 5% of the voting population for the GOP? That is a massive margin. I think today you saw the beginning that maybe it's more. And I think we need to ask every GOP representative at the state, local, and federal levels, we need to ask them, do you support the former President, Donald Trump? And after hearing the hearings, after listening to the hearings today, it's going to be very difficult for people to say that with a straight face. However, we do have cult-like activities out there, and individuals really believe that Donald Trump was chosen at this moment for the United States. And I think that's something we're going to have to get our arms around also, are the conspiracy theories and fantasies that are driving people to believe some of this. - Former President Trump's Chief of Staff Mark Meadows turned over thousands of emails and documents to the Committee but then refused to testify, claiming executive privilege protected him from having to testify about confidential Matters. What does today's detailed and damning testimony from one of his closest aides mean for him? - I think it's a real challenge for his legal team. And I think it goes to show, I said initially, that Mark Meadows was the MVP for this committee. And then, I've also stated that he's the Rosetta Stone. He's sort of in the center of everything that was happening. So if you think about all the different groups that are involved, you have to think that Mark Meadows had knowledge of most of what was happening. And if he saw things that were untoward, if he saw things that were awful or illegal or things that were leading towards domestic terrorism, you know, I find it a real problem-- really, somebody breaking their oath, being complicit in their silence, that they didn't sort of jump out in front of that and try to stop it. - And Representative Cheney concluded the hearing with quotes from potential witnesses and what she called very serious concerns about efforts to influence their testimony. How serious are those allegations? DENVER RIGGLEMAN: Well, not only are those allegations serious, it doesn't surprise me at all, right? Just, like both political parties are tribes. And right now, you know, you can talk about extremism on both sides, but right now, the GOP is in a hold my beer moment. You have individuals that are very worried about this testimony. So you know, they're promising jobs, and promising these individuals that they can stay in the tribe. And there's also that underlying implication of a threat that they will no longer have those jobs if they say the wrong things in testimony to the committee. And that's something in America that we have to push back against very hard. - And we heard today that the former president was aware of the violence taking place at the Capitol and was even warned that the situation was not safe, yet he still fought to go to the capital. What kind of light does that shed on his state of mind? DENVER RIGGLEMAN: Well, it shows, you know, number one that he probably liked what was happening. But I want to say this. You know, I don't know what's in the former President's Trump's head or heart, and I don't want to. It's just, you just go with the facts. And the facts state right now that-- by the way, that means everybody would have to be lying if you didn't believe it at this point, right? Every single person in front of the committee. The facts say that the president was aware and, if not overtly, tacitly supporting a domestic terrorism event. Those who have supported Trump need to answer to the last six hearings, but especially the one today. And they better be prepared because what's coming up, I think, is going to really shock the American people, especially when it comes to the data portion of the hearings. - Oh, you think that there is still another shoe to drop, if you will? - I think there's multiple shoes to drop. I think when you look at the groups that were mentioned today, you notice, they still haven't really dug deep into the Oath Keepers or the Proud Boys or their right-wing extremist groups, DOJ-charged defendants, rally planners. Yeah, we talked about alternate electors, but there's still more to see there. LINSEY DAVIS: Denver Riggleman, we so appreciate your insight to all of this. Thank you so much for coming on the show. - Thanks, Linsey. - The deadliest human smuggling incident in US history. That is what they are calling the death of at least 50 people who were found inside a trailer in Texas. This is just the latest tragedy to happen in the Lone Star State. Our Matt Gutman is there with this report. MATT GUTMAN (VOICEOVER): Tonight, first responders describing a tractor trailer filled with death. - The floor of the trailer was covered with dead bodies. MATT GUTMAN (VOICEOVER): That tractor-trailer carrying migrants abandoned on this rural road in Southwest San Antonio Monday evening. The driver had fled. - It was a horrific scene, something I'll never forget. MATT GUTMAN (VOICEOVER): Some of the victims had made it out of the truck only to collapse on the road, first responders checking the bodies one by one. - We put a monitor on every single one of those people to make sure that there were no signs of life. - Just to be 100% sure? - Just to be 100% sure. MATT GUTMAN (VOICEOVER): Tonight, there are 13 survivors. MATT GUTMAN: How close to death were these living patients? - Very close. They were extremely critical. MATT GUTMAN (VOICEOVER): Now facing organ failure from severe heat stroke and exhaustion. Temperatures as high as 103 degrees in San Antonio Monday, the city on track to have its warmest June on record. - Those people suffered. The heat was torrential. There was no air in that vehicle. There was no water. The AC was not running. MATT GUTMAN (VOICEOVER): A federal official telling ABC News this is the deadliest case of human smuggling in US history. - Today, we mourn for those 51 immigrants. MATT GUTMAN (VOICEOVER): Tonight, police telling ABC the truck's driver and two others are in custody, Homeland Security now leading the investigation as authorities work to identify the victims. And among the dead, men and women from Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras. - Our thanks to Matt Gutman for that. Now to the new legal wranglings in the wake of the Supreme Court decision overturning Roe v. Wade. And there are growing calls for President Biden to act to protect abortion rights as patients seeking abortion care in half of the country now scramble to get help. ABC's Rachel Scott reports from the Planned Parenthood Clinic in Flossmoor, Illinois. RACHEL SCOTT (VOICEOVER): Tonight, facing growing pressure, President Biden's health secretary insisted the administration is looking at every option to protect abortion rights. - There is no magic bullet. But if there is something we can do, we will find it, and we will do it. RACHEL SCOTT (VOICEOVER): Secretary Xavier Becerra outlining steps like increasing access to medication abortion, but offering few specifics. Our Mary Bruce pressing for details. - When can we expect more concrete steps to be announced? What's the holdup here? - It was a long decision, and it did upend 50 years of precedent. And so you want to make sure that what you do is within, as I said, the confines of the law. We're not interested in going rogue. RACHEL SCOTT (VOICEOVER): The battle over abortion rights now turns to the states. At least 13 have stopped nearly all abortions, about a dozen others set to take action in the coming weeks and months. CROWD: My body! My choice! RACHEL SCOTT (VOICEOVER): Abortion rights demonstrators marching from Illinois to Iowa. - We have to protect our siblings who can't-- this does affect in other states. RACHEL SCOTT (VOICEOVER): Illinois now a safe haven surrounded by states banning or severely restricting access to abortion, bracing for up to 30,000 more women to travel here over the year. - Patients who are struggling to make ends meet, who are deciding, do I pay my rent or do I got to feed my kids? And now they have this-- not only added expense and time of needing an abortion, but also the time they have to take off work, and the child care, and the lodging. It's really heartbreaking. - And people describe being in a rock and a hard place, certainly. Rachel Scott joins us now. Rachel, what's ahead for lawsuits challenging the trigger laws in many states? - Well, tonight, Linsey, the legal challenges do continue. We know that federal judges have put the abortion bans on hold in Louisiana and Utah for now. And so the reality for abortion providers in that state, they are scrambling to try and reschedule appointments for patients that they've canceled over the last few days, Linsey. LINSEY DAVIS: All right. Rachel Scott, our thanks to you. Overseas now to the war in Ukraine tonight. Rescue teams are still probing the wreckage of a shopping mall destroyed by Russian missiles, a civilian target far from the front lines. At least 18 are dead. ABC's James Longman is at the scene. JAMES LONGMAN (VOICEOVER): Tonight, this is the moment a Russian missile hits a mall in Kremenchuk, the video shared by President Zelenskyy. People in a nearby park captured on security cameras react to the incoming strike. You can see the shockwave rippling across the water, one man jumping in, another clutching a child, scrambling behind a tree for safety. 20 people are now confirmed dead. 40 are still missing. Nikolai works in the mall and was injured when it was hit. - [SPEAKING UKRAINIAN] JAMES LONGMAN (VOICEOVER): "It went dark," he says, "and someone helped me get out. But not even the hospital is safe from Russia. [SIREN BLARING] - Another air raid siren-- - [SPEAKING UKRAINIAN] - --which people are dealing with all the time here. Ukraine says a factory behind this mall was also hit. They say it made cars and that, contrary to Russian claims, it wasn't a military installation. And tonight, Linsey, President Zelenskyy has spoken to the United Nations Security Council. He said that Russia should lose its seat on that Council permanently. Linsey? LINSEY DAVIS: James, thank you. And still to come here, the 101-year-old, conviction for his role in the horrors committed by the Nazis. And voters have headed to the polls in eight states, and in some, the results are starting to come in. Rick Klein is standing by. [MUSIC PLAYING] Welcome back. We're tracking several headlines around the world. A four-story residential building collapse in India's financial capital of Mumbai killing at least 19 people, with more feared trapped under the rubble. More than a dozen people were injured in the accident, of which 10 were discharged from hospitals after treatment. Building collapses are common in Mumbai during monsoon season, mostly because of poor construction. [WHOOSH] A 101-year-old man was convicted of 3,518 counts of accessory to murder for serving at a Nazi concentration camp during World War II. A court sentenced him to five years in prison. The man, who was not identified, had denied working as an SS guard at the camp and aiding and abetting the murder of thousands of prisoners. [WHOOSH] NATO ally Turkey lifted its veto over Finland and Sweden's bid to join the Western alliance after the three nations agreed to protect each other's security, ending a weeks-long drama that tested Allied unity against Russia's invasion of Ukraine. The breakthrough came after four hours of talks just before a NATO summit began in Madrid. Of course, we have a big night of midterm primaries ahead tonight as voters go to the polls in eight states. So let's bring in our ABC News political director Mr. Rick Klein for what to watch on tonight. Rick, thank you so much for joining us. Today's voting comes in the wake, of course, of the Supreme Court's monumental decision overturning Roe v. Wade. How is the issue of abortion playing out in today's contests? - Yeah, Linsey, a big day of multistate voting. And the races to watch are our races right now that have good access to abortion-- states like Colorado, Illinois, New York, all of those states have Democratic governors who have maintained that they want to protect a woman's right to choose wherever they can. But they have aggressive Republican challengers in each of those states. Republicans really think they can make inroads in a couple of those places, even though they've got a recent history of Democratic governance. And, of course, the ruling on Friday underscores the stakes. Because in many cases, those Republicans say they would come in and restrict abortion rights in a serious way. It's even a factor in a place like New York. We think of it nationally as such a blue state, but this is an example. This is the Trump-Biden numbers by county from 2020. You see big splotches of red, a lot of places where Republicans think they can make inroads if, of course, they nominate the right candidate tonight. - And in some races tonight, Democrats are trying a unique strategy, really, of trying to influence who wins in Republican primaries. Explain what's going on there. - Yeah, Linsey, this is high-risk, high-reward for Democrats. And it's going on in the state of Colorado. Again, a purple-ish state, it's been voting Democratic at the national level for the last couple election cycles. But Democrats there are spending heavily to boost the candidates on the Republican side who are the most extreme, the senate candidate and the governor's candidate both who are biggest supporters of the MAGA movement, all of them election deniers, extremists on abortion rights. They're being attacked through this campaign as too conservative for Colorado. And that may sound like an attack, but let me tell you, in the confines of a Republican primary, that's actually high praise, and everyone involved knows it. And this happens in politics all the time. You see lots of candidates try to choose your own opponent. The problem, though, in a year like this is, when you have the kind of stakes that Democrats are warning about, in a state like Colorado, could you actually elect someone who is more of on the extreme view around election integrity, around abortion rights? You're taking a big risk, potentially. We've already seen the same strategy help Doug Mastriano become the governor of Pennsylvania. He's a full-blown election denier who was actually at the January 6 rally. He's now the Republican nominee for governor. - And as the battle for the House plays out, some incumbents are in danger, of course, of losing their seats tonight. What are some of the races that you're watching on that front in particular? - Linsey, at least two incumbents are going to lose tonight we don't know. Who they are yet. The reason, though, that that's going to happen is you have, because of redistricting, a situation where two Republicans are running against each other in this sort of strangely gerrymandered district around Springfield through the central and more rural parts of Illinois. You have Congresswoman Mary Miller and Congressman Rodney Davis squaring off against each other. Now, Congresswoman Miller got the Trump endorsement over the weekend. She also said, at a rally with the former president, thank you for the way that you're helping white life. That got a lot of blowback. She says she misspoke. That's being used against her in that race. Meanwhile, two Democrats are running against each other here in the suburbs of Chicago. You have Congresswoman Marie Neumann and Congressman Sean Casten facing off. Part of what's interesting here, Linsey, is that last election cycle, Marie Neumann actually won her seat by defeating one of the few Democratic incumbents who opposed abortion rights. So she rode a wave of potential outrage and anger over Roe v. Wade. We'll see if that carries through tonight. - All right, Rick Klein. Of course, we're going to have much more election analysis with you tonight as the results come in. And that is our show for tonight. Be sure to stay tuned to ABC News Live for more context and analysis of the day's top stories. I'm Linsey Davis. Thanks so much for streaming with us. Have a great night. [MUSIC PLAYING]

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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