New school alert system may help save lives during a shooting

One company created a system called ALERT, which can shave off seconds, maybe even minutes, from police response times.
3:38 | 12/08/21

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Transcript for New school alert system may help save lives during a shooting
- Back now here on GMA with the new technology that can potentially save lives. It's been just over a week now since that tragic Oxford High School shooting with more than 650 mass shootings in the US this year. One company is tackling the issue, creating an alert, a system, that shaves seconds, maybe even minutes, off of police response times. Our Victor Oquendo has these details for us. Victor, good morning. - Good morning, TJ. ALERT rolled out in the spring of 2020 and ever since, it has spread across the country. Now it's making its way into businesses. - All units be advised, active shooter. VICTOR OQUENDO: You're looking at what police say is new, potentially life-saving technology. - The suspect went down the first left hallway. - Just saw the officers going down the hallway there. And she's guiding them every step of the way. VICTOR OQUENDO: Pre-pandemic, ABC News getting an exclusive look at a demonstration of ALERT, Active Law Enforcement Response Technology, being used in schools, and now businesses across 14 states. ALERT gives police access to real time surveillance cameras within a building once a panic button is hit during an active incident. They can then identify and track a suspect's location, relaying that information to officers as they respond. - This streamlines everything from communication to surveillance. VICTOR OQUENDO: Lee Mandel began developing the program after the tragedy at Sandy Hook. - It really hit home. And we said, how can we make a difference? When they arrive on the scene, they know exactly where to go, how to get in, where the shooter is. VICTOR OQUENDO: Andrew Pollack lost his daughter, Meadow, at Parkland. Since then, he's been involved in legislative efforts but says his overriding mission is school safety. - If this type of software was in place, she'd be alive today. There were so many failures that day. VICTOR OQUENDO: Pollack creating the school safety grant, which provides unlimited funding to make the software available nationwide, free of charge. - And then not just in schools. Hospitals, movie theaters, houses of worship, anywhere where people gather. Those grants will cover the full implementation, full deployment, and all the software for life. VICTOR OQUENDO: ALERT now provided to more than 50 entities nationwide, including health facilities, a sporting arena, and police departments. The first recipient, Coral Springs Police. They were the first to enter the school the day of the Parkland shooting. - It's life changing. It's taking us from being in a rowboat to being in a starship. VICTOR OQUENDO: Coral Springs Charter School, just two miles from Stoneman Douglas, also a recipient. - I would hope that most schools have the opportunity to look into this. - The shooter is going to be going to the left. VICTOR OQUENDO: ABC News right there as officers used ALERT for the first time last year. - All units be advised. VICTOR OQUENDO: During the drill, the dispatcher immediately alerts police, then takes over the school's PA system. - Shooter, drop your weapon. VICTOR OQUENDO: She relays crucial information. - Suspect is going to be a white male with a black shirt and camo pants. VICTOR OQUENDO: With the school on lockdown, she can unlock the door for police. - Copy, unlocking the door. VICTOR OQUENDO: As officers rush to the scene, she tracks the shooter. - The suspect should be in the first hallway to the left. - He's close to the middle school bathrooms. - You're walking towards the suspect. - That's a gun. - [INAUDIBLE] in custody. VICTOR OQUENDO: The suspect apprehended in less than four minutes. - God forbid that technology has to be used, do you think it could help save lives? - Absolutely. 100%. - This is the future of responding. My daughter will be saying, well, look, what we did now, Daddy. - And ALERT tells us they have received hundreds of requests for grants. Soon, they say, you'll see their technology implemented in small businesses, warehouses, even HOAs. TJ. - Potential lifesaver. Victor, thank you as always.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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